Genesis and Judaism: The Perspective of Genesis Rabbah

This digital dictionary aims to provide an efficient tool for further cultural and linguistic studies, not only in the field of Rabbinics, but also in order to promote the research on the interaction between the Jewish tradition with other cultures in the Greco-Roman worlds in Late Antiquity. The objective of this project consists in the compilation of a digital dictionary in TEI format by using the VLE tool and the annotation of the loanwords in the corpus for the investigation of issues pertaining to sociolinguistics as well as corpus linguistics. It was compiled during the 5th CE in Roman Palestine. GenR is an exegetical Midrash an interpretation of the Biblical text in rabbinic Judaism. It contains short explanations of words and sentences, often in Aramaic, but also highly difficile and subtle narrative explanations and interpretations of the Biblical text. GenR displays the Rabbinic-Jewish worldview and maps out numerous rabbinic theological concepts e. Many references into non-Jewish philosophical thought and literature are made, usually in a non-explicit way. GenR is rich in foreign words, especially Greek, the study of which will be the main objective of the project. This project aims at covering some of the desiderata concerning GenR, and intends to provide an up-to-date digital supplement to the lexicography of Greek loanwords in the Rabbinic literature, which still remains unfulfilled, especially due to the interdisciplinary character of the research.

Confronting Creation: How Judaism Reads Genesis: An Anthology of Genesis Rabbah

Don’t have an account? This section of the book illustrates how the Inventory applies to a specific text in the form of a sample profile of an important work, in this case Genesis Rabbah. This profile is drawn from a public, online database accompanying the book literarydatase. Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

and ninth centuries these compilationsGenesis Rabbah is perhaps the oldest, and from Philo on the sole basis of the Midrash’s later date of compilation.

Expository Midrash to the first book of the Pentateuch, assigned by tradition to the amora Hoshaiah, commonly Osha’yah, who flourished in the third century in Palestine. The Midrash forms a haggadic commentary on the whole of Genesis, in keeping with the character of the Midrashic exegesis demanded by that age. In a continuous sequence, broken only toward the end, the Biblical text is expounded verse for verse, often word forword; only genealogic passages, and such as furnish no material for exposition as the reiterated account of Abraham’s servant in Gen.

The Bereshit Rabbah contains many simple explanations of words and sentences, often in the Aramaic language, suitable for the instruction of youth; and also the most varied haggadic expositions popular in the public lectures of the synagogues and schools. According to the material or the sources at the disposal of the editor of the Midrash, he has strung together various longer or shorter explanations and haggadic interpretations of the successive passages, sometimes anonymously, sometimes citing the author.

Again, he adds to the running commentary longer haggadic disquisitions or narratives, connected in some way with the verse in question, or with one of the explanations of it—a method not unusual in the Talmud and in other Midrashim. The first chapters of Genesis, on the creation of the world and of man, naturally furnished especially rich material for this mode of exegesis.

Ruth Rabbah

The history of Torah is one of interpretation. Every seemingly superfluous letter, unclear transition and difficult phrase invites discussion, explanation and elaboration. These texts offer a glimpse of the ways that people of various times and places have grappled to understand the biblical text and to make it meaningful for their own lives. Collections that contain mostly stories, parables, and homilies are classified as midrash aggadah , while collections focused primarily on the derivation of law are called midrash halakhah.

The largest volumes of midrash aggadah are often referred to collectively as Midrash Rabbah.

Genesis Rabbah, which dates to the amoraic period, is the first work of rab- binic midrash on the book of Genesis. Earlier, tannaitic, works of midrash were.

It is a midrash comprising a collection of ancient rabbinical homiletical interpretations of the Book of Genesis B’reshith in Hebrew. It is expository midrash to the first book of the Torah , assigned by tradition to the amora Hoshaiah or Osha’yah , who flourished in the third century in Roman Syria Palaestina. The midrash forms an aggadic commentary on Genesis, in keeping with the midrashic exegesis of that age.

In a continuous sequence, broken only toward the end, the Biblical text is expounded, verse for verse, often word for word. Only genealogic passages and passages that furnish no material for exposition as the reiterated account of Abraham ‘s servant in Genesis are omitted. Genesis Rabbah contains many simple explanations of words and sentences, often in the Aramaic language , suitable for the instruction of youth.

It also contains varied aggadic expositions popular in the public lectures of the synagogues and schools. The editor of the midrash has strung together various longer or shorter explanations and aggadic interpretations of the successive passages, sometimes anonymously, sometimes citing the author. The editor adds to the running commentary longer aggadic disquisitions or narratives, connected in some way with the verse in question, or with one of the explanations of it — a method not unusual in the Talmud and in other midrashim.

The first chapters of Genesis, on the creation of the world and of man , furnished especially rich material for this mode of exegesis. Whole sections are devoted to comments on one or two verses of the text. Many references to contemporary philosophical thought are made with the purpose of refuting the opinions of nonbelievers. References to contemporaneous conditions and historical events also occur.

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Midrash, a type of exegesis of scriptural texts practised by Jews. The genre of midrash is characterized by the use of an explicit citation of, or clear allusions to, a passage in an authoritative text in order to provide a foundation for religious teachings often far removed from the plain meaning of the passage employed. In halakhic midrash such teachings comprise legal rulings.

Midrash Bereshit Rabbah thus was according to our findings obviously the Genizah can be dated according to their paleographical features to the fifth or.

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we’ll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer – no Kindle device required. To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number. Genesis Rabbah , the earliest rabbinic commentary on Genesis, was composed in Roman Palestine around the 5th century CE.

In this volume, an international team of scholars explores the literary formation and textual transmission of this work in late antiquity, and the historical, cultural, religious, and political contexts from which it emerged. Some essays study the multi-layered nature of this text, the relationship of the traditions within the collection to one another and to other compositions, its redaction, its manuscript history, and the interpretive strategies it applies to biblical verses.

Other essays explore how the midrash engages with Greco-Roman literature, competing theological and exegetical ideas found in contemporary Christian works, and other genres of Jewish literature. The collection aims to advance scholarly conversations about the classical rabbinic corpus; midrash; religions of late antiquity; interactions between Jews, Christians, and others in the Greco-Roman world; and the reception of Genesis Rabbah in medieval and modern times.

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Genesis Rabbah Dating

Aug 29 9 Elul Torah Portion. Who is God speaking to? Is there an alternate way the verse can be understood? Thank you for your very important question.

egetical and homiletical material like Genesis Rabbah and Pesiqta de Rab that in certain respects evoke piyyuṭ.5 These later texts are difficult to date, both.

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Midrash Rabbah

Gerrie F. Snyman 1. This essay enquires into the reception of the story of Cain and Abel Gen 4 in late ancient Judaism Genesis Rabbah, Targum Onkelos, Targum Neofiti, and Targum Pseudo-Jonathan with regard to the way Cain is portrayed differently from how he is depicted in the Hebrew text. The perspective from which his portrayal in the Jewish literature of late antiquity will be viewed is that of vulnerability or fragility, asking the question whether the reception of Cain in Jewish antiquity allow for such vulnerability in the interpretation of the story, or does he remain a villainous character who refused to be redeemed.

The question of the redemption of Cain is formulated within a her-meneutic of vulnerability as a framework to deal with the perpetration of apartheid.

Bereshith Rabba also called Genesis Rabbah. This text dates from the sixth century C.E. A midrash on Genesis, it offers explanations of words and sentences​.

This page is a stub. Please contact us if you would like to assist in its development. Bereshit Rabbah Names Bereshit Rabbah. Moshe Maimonides attributes a commentary on Sefer Bereshit to R. Hoshaya 3rd century , 5 it appears that the Midrash was not compiled before the 5th century. Rashi Bereshit About R. Shelomo Yitzchaki 7 states that Bereshit Rabbah was written in Israel, and there is general consensus on this. The Midrash is written in Hebrew mixed with Galilean Aramaic.

It also makes occasional use of Greek words. Manuscripts — There are a number of extant manuscripts of Bereshit Rabbah as well as Genizah fragments.

Genesis 7 (12/8/16)